Archive for the ‘Off the Runway ...’ Category

Sandbanks Conierge …

Sunday, January 3rd, 2016

Attention to detail… Sandbanks Concierge

We pride ourselves on always remembering that details are important, and that a flight exists in the context of an entire journey. And every journey exists in the context of our client’s wider lives too, and in those busy lives are a multitude of small but important details that need attending to.  So wouldn’t it be nice to know that there is a company out there dedicated to doing just that for discerning people with busy schedules. Well there is… Sandbanks Concierge!

Aviastra is extremely happy to be associated with Sandbanks Concierge; it is run by Mark Morris who brings to his company many years’ experience of dedicated and bespoke service to a wide variety of clients. His service is so grounded as to look after the routine things in life and so special and flexible as to cater for any other requirement you could (almost!) possibly imagine.

Mark and Sandbanks Concierge can be reached on +44 (0)7944 884 174 or Mark@SandbanksConcierge.co.uk and www.SandbanksConcierge.co.uk

Aircraft » Light Jets » Citation II Bravo

Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

Citation II Bravo


Private Charter Jet - Citation IIPrivate Charter Jet - Citation II


  • A direct development of the Citation I, the Citation II led to the development of the IISP and the Bravo. It is faster, bigger and more powerful than its predecessor but with the same winning design philosophy.
  • The Citation II variants cruise at approximately 400 kts at 43,000ft. The cabin has greater space and seats 8 passengers.
  • This is another ideal choice for short to medium range business trips.

If you have any questions about this aircraft or to discuss your charter requirements please call a Flight Manager on +44 (0)1202 375 444

Spring is nearly here …

Monday, February 23rd, 2015

Charter Flights


Spring is nearly here! Honestly! Why not take a look at our airport guide for jetting off to sunnier climbs and last minute Winter sport escapes!

Click here to see where you could go! … airport guide

Happy New Year !!!

Tuesday, January 6th, 2015

Happy New Year from Aviastra Flight Charter!

Welcome to 2015, happy air charter !

Merry Christmas from Aviastra Flight Charter !!! …

Monday, December 22nd, 2014

Merry Christmas from Aviastra Flight Charter !

NBAA welcomes global emissions proposals

Monday, March 4th, 2013

 

Global Emissions Proposals

 

The National Business Aviation Association has welcomed global moves toward new standards to limit aircraft carbon emissions and continue the process of reducing noise levels.

The International Civil Aviation Organisation-led Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection (CAEP), following three years of deliberation, has recommended a metric and standards on carbon dioxide emissions, and for reducing noise levels emitted by aircraft between now and 2020.

“These accomplishments highlight a spirit of global co-operation among nations when it comes to aviation policy making,” says NBAA president Ed Bolen of the proposals. Our association, along with the International Business Aviation Council and the General Aviation Manufacturers Association, worked diligently to create standards that are technically and economically feasible, as well as environmentally beneficial, he adds.

In a veiled reference to European proposals for a compulsory unilateral carbon trading system for business aircraft, Bolen says: “Carbon emissions by aircraft are difficult to measure consistently across a wide range of business aircraft types because a single power plant can behave differently when used in different aircraft configurations.”

During the past three years, a committee on aviation environmental protection working group, including representatives from the business aviation communities in the US and Europe, worked diligently to create a metric by which all aircraft carbon emissions can be measured, and a standard by which that metric can be used, he adds. “This represents a milestone.”

Bolen maintains that the global ICAO system has credibility, and will enable the business aviation community “to standardise and measure emissions reductions, as part of the industry’s overall goal of significantly lowering aircraft emissions by the year 2050″.

The new standard calls for a seven-decibel reduction (-7epndb) in noise generated by aircraft larger than 55t built after 2017, and a similar reduction in noise generated by smaller aircraft built after 2020.

Bolen welcomes a proposed concession to help the business aviation community achieve the new targets, explaining: “The working group realised that a seven-decibel reduction would be more difficult to achieve for manufacturers of smaller aircraft, and that more time would be needed for compliance. So they have three more years for research, development and testing, to ensure they can meet the standard while maintaining the high levels of quality that are the hallmarks of the general aviation industry.”

The CAEP recommendations will be reviewed by the ICAO council in the second quarter, and taken up for approval by the ICAO general assembly later this year.

 
 
source:flightglobal

Embraer displays new Legacy 500 …

Friday, October 19th, 2012
 

Embraer Legacy 500

 

Embraer has publicly displayed a freshly-painted Legacy 500 for the first time as the company moves closer to a long-delayed maiden flight of the mid-size business jet by the end of the year.
“That was just all a bad dream now,” Edwards says. “The components are bolted in, the software was plugged in. [Parker] got into some difficulties. We and BAE had to move in and help them through those difficulties.”

Embraer plans to complete the flight certification programme for the Legacy 500 by the end of 2013, with the first Embraer 450 beginning its certification testing around the same time.

The Legacy aircraft initially will be assembled at Embraer’s headquarters in Sao Jose dos Campos, with the composite sections delivered from a newly-opened facility in Evora, Portugal. But company executives are open to moving the final assembly site to other locations if necessary to meet market demand.

Embraer started building the Phenom-series light jets in Gaviao Peixoto, Brazil, but is moving production to Melbourne, Florida, except for Phenoms ordered by Latin American customers. A similar strategy could be adopted for the Legacy series if demand is sufficient, Embraer says.

The first of four flight test aircraft was rolled out in a private ceremony for Embraer employees last December. But the company kept the aircraft out of public view as problems with the jet’s unique fly-by-wire system delayed first flight from October last year to the fourth quarter of 2012.

But the company is now showing more confidence as the first flight milestone finally approaches, allowing a group of journalists on 5 October to board the aircraft and even make side-stick inputs to move the flight controls of the parked aircraft.

The company is now working to validate the final software block for the flight control system, with the programme’s chief test pilot on site at Parker Aerospace to finish the job.

The Legacy 500 and the smaller 450 were launched in 2007, targeting the mid-size business jet sector long dominated by such aircraft the Cessna Sovereign, Hawker 950 and Learjet 65XR. The delay of the Legacy 500 has eroded some of Embraer’s first-mover advantage, as Cessna has launched the Latitude and Bombardier has revealed the Learjet 70/75 programmes during the past year.

“Back in 2008 nobody else was talking about mid light or mid-size airplanes with a stand-up cabin. Now our competitors are responding,” says Ernest Edwards, Embraer’s president for executive jets. “We see our competitors coming out with their products as a validation of the market we identified several years ago.”

The Legacy 500 also features a three-axis fly-by-wire control system, a unique technology in the mid-size business jet sector. But Embraer’s supplier — Parker Aerospace — struggled with the task of integrating the control devices with the fight control computer. As delays mounted, Embraer brought in engineers from BAE Systems to help Parker, and finally took over the integration task itself, Edwards says.

 

 

Source:Flight International

Falcon 7X scores a double century …

Thursday, August 23rd, 2012

 

Falcon 7X rolls off the production line

The 200th Falcon 7X has rolled off the production line at Dassault’s Bordeaux-Merignac production facility in southern France where it is being readied for completion. “The 7X is clearly the best seller in the current Falcon family and remains one of the most sought-after jets in its [long-range] category,” says Dassault Falcon president John Rosanvallon. To date, Dassault has delivered more than 150 7Xs, while another 80 are in various stages of production or outfitting. The 7X fleet has logged more than 130,000 flight hours since it entered service in 2007 and is in operation in 32 countries, says the French airframer,

 Meanwhile, Dassault says it has set up a programme to provide special support for Falcon operators flying to London for the 2012 Olympic Games.

“The company has doubled its Luton airport-based GoTeam capacity and taken steps to ensure that ample spares inventories are available in the area,” it says. “Now that all Falcons are approved for London City airport [steep approach] operations, we expect even more aircraft to fly to London and are deploying extra personnel and resources [during the event].”

 

source:flightinternational

UK CAA clears diabetic pilots and air traffic controllers …

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

 

UK CAA clears diabetic pilots & air traffic controllers

 

The UK Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) has announced that pilots and air traffic control officers (ATCOs) with diabetes who use medication such as insulin can now be considered for medical certification due to improvements in treatment.

The Authority explains: “Until now, only a limited number of medications for the treatment of diabetes have been allowed for pilots and air traffic controllers applying for Class 1, 2 and 3 medical certificates. [But] there have been advances in the treatment and monitoring of the disease, allowing the control of the condition and any complications to be managed more effectively.

“The decision should allow more licensed pilots and ATCOs who have diabetes to continue to undertake operational duties safely.”

The CAA emphasised that individual diabetic applicants will “be subject to a rigorous monitoring regime, including demonstrated stability of their condition, and regular blood sample self-testing during flight/duty. This is to ensure that an individual does not begin a flight or shift with too high, or too low, a sugar level, and that a safe level is maintained.”

Guidance will shortly be issued to pilots and ATCOs, the CAA adds, which will set out the new procedures to follow. This includes the application of operational restrictions and in-flight testing regimes.

 

source:pro news/flightglobal

Canada Advances Biofuel Testing …

Friday, July 13th, 2012

Canada Advances Biofuel Testing with Vintage T-33 Trainer

 

The National Research Council (NRC) of Canada has for the first time conducted biofuel test flights using chase aircraft to measure the emissions. The campaign is among a number of different projects which the government research and development body is presenting at Farnborough this year.

The biofuel test flights were completed in May and June 2012 using a Canadian-gown feedstock based on brassica carinata. NRC’s flight research laboratory employed its Dassault Falcon 20 to test the fuel and a Lockheed T-33 vintage jet trainer to trail the business aircraft and measure its emissions in real time.

Stewart Baillie, director of the institute’s flight research laboratory, says the Falcon crew was able to switch back and forth between standard Jet A1 and the biofuel blend with Jet A1. This showed that the biofuel emissions comprised “significantly less” particulate matter, such as black carbon and sulphate, than Jet A1, he says. The results are preliminary and a full assessment is underway before NRC publishes its final report.

The Canadian institute was the first to use biofuel beyond a 50:50 blend ratio, which is currently the maximum-certified limit by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). While NRC conducted some flights with a standard 50:50 mixture, it also employed a 60:40 blend.

No difference was detected by the pilots when they changed between conventional Jet A1 and biofuel. Bailey says that the crew reported that the aircraft’s performance was “indistinguishable” during a range of ground and flight operations, including engine restarts at altitude.

The biofuel – named “Resonance” – has been newly developed by Canada-based Agrisoma Bioscience. The crops used for the NRC tests were grown in the Saskatchewan prairie province in 2011. But this year, Agrisoma says, this has commercially been contracted on a “significant” scale in western Canada. The biotechnology company adds that brassica carinata is ideally suited as a non-food industrial oilseed, because it grows it in semi-arid areas unsuitable for food production with “reduced overall crop input requirements”.

Among NRC’s other projects is the development of a stochastic model to predict ice build-up on airframe structures more accurately. This has now been licensed to the Montreal-based icing simulation specialist Newmerical Technologies.

The work focussed in particular on the melting and refreezing of water droplets as they move across aircraft structures, for example, wings downstream from the anti-ice systems. “It’s all about better characterising the randomness of water in the atmosphere and how it interacts with the surfaces in the aerodynamic flow,” says Baillie.

The model allows simulating the formation of rough and discontinuous, three-dimensional ice structures and to predict the density and surface quality of accreted ice.

Ice can build up in unexpected areas, namely the engine core, and this was the focus in another recent project that NRC conducted together with Boeing. Following 46 reported power-loss cases at high altitude since 1990, the researchers proved in wind tunnel tests that ice can build up in the low-pressure compressor (LPC) of gas turbine engines.

The incidents, which included uncommanded thrust roll-backs, flaming-out, stalling and LPC damage through shed ice took place at altitudes above 23,000ft (7,000m), which is usually considered to be the upper limit where liquid water droplets exist. However, they all happened in the vicinity of thunder clouds in tropical regions.

The researchers proved that ingested ice-crystals can partially melt and refreeze on internal components in areas such as ducts, where airflow changes can cause sudden temperature variations. Baillie says this kind of analysis had not been done before but will be useful for regulators in North America and Europe as they begin certifying commercial gas turbine engines against this type of ice build-up this year.

 

source:flightglobal/flightinternational